• Do you want to know more about your design team and their problem-solving capacities?

  • Does your company suffer from low retention of designers?

  • Do you always struggle to keep your creative staff motivated and challenged?

  • Do you want your design teams to work at their peak performance?

  • Do you want to offer training for your creative staff but they don't show interest?

Rational Chaos

I am offering a series of curated workshops aimed at increasing the problem-solving capabilities of the in-house design teams in the industry. The workshops are based on the Function-Behaviour-Structure design framework which has been developed through studying many high-performance design and engineering teams. The sessions are specifically aimed at highly-creative staff that need motivation and intellectual challenges all the time to stay excited about their role.

Workshops

Design Competency Discovery

Collaborative Design Review

Design Thinking Strategies and Methods

Function-Behaviour-Structure Framework

Design Brief Analysis and Problem Formulation

Product Family Development and Modular Design

• Design Linkography (Constraints and Dependencies)

Testimonials

  • Dr Morteza's teaching method is unique and fun. He explains all the topics by comparing them with real-life situations making them easy to understand. Besides that, he also gave valuable feedback to improve one's personal skills.

  • His way to teach is very practical, he is always sharing his experience to understand a better way the topic.

  • Morteza is always keen to help and shares a lot of his industrial knowledge.

  • He has an amazing way of breakdown things to make us understand. You feel pushed to learn, try out new competencies and gain valuable feedback that helps to improve.

  • The teacher is great. He is so passionate about the subject and he inspired us to learn more about the subject. His experience and knowledge are excellent and the way he teaches is easy to understand.

  • Morteza is a great lecturer. His classes are engaging and revolve around him teaching a subject he clearly knows well, not just reading slides. They were never boring and were adapted based on comments from the previous sessions.

  • Fully satisfied! Best in explanation of doubts and topics.

Function • Behaviour • Structure

The Function-Behaviour-Structure (FBS) ontology of designing is based upon a purposeful, process-based view of design. Originating from concepts of knowledge representation for machine learning, this framework aims at constructing prototypes of design knowledge through different types of design issues. The design activities then become processes that aim at translating a set of requirement issues into a set of solution issues. The FBS ontology of design constructs models of both design knowledge and the design process.

Understanding the Function-Behaviour-Structure framework brings insight and structure to a designer's problem-solving activities. They will be able to filter through the requirements of the design brief, make better assumptions about missing aspects of the design task, formulate a clear problem, and come up with better solutions.


There are two major currents in offering process-based models of design activities, namely prescriptive and descriptive approaches (Asimow, 1962). A prescriptive model of design provides a procedure for how designers must act. There are many different instances of such prescriptive models in engineering design, product design, and architecture (Cross, 2000; Jones, 1970; Pahl et al., 2007; Ullman, 1944). Most of these models are based on a four-phase process of designing; namely, formulating, synthesising, analysing, and optimising (Asimow, 1962). The actual behaviour of designers, however, is far more complex and cognitively intense than the prescribed procedures.

Designing is an iterative process whereby designers go through cycles of small processes (Beitz et al., 2007), which can be modelled through scientific tools that are able to handle the concepts and processes of concern in designing. A collection of such concepts, called ontology, is used to build structured models of knowledge in different fields (Alberts, 1993).

Employing an ontological view of designing has particular benefits for the concerns of this thesis. Ontological concepts are sufficiently generic to be applied when modelling knowledge in different contexts, including customisation. Yet, they are specific enough to define clear boundaries for concepts in each domain and to prevent misinterpretation between concepts from different domains. In the following section, I introduce a well-established and popular design ontology, which could be used to study customisation from a design point of view.

The Function-Behaviour-Structure (FBS) ontology of designing (Gero, 1990) is based upon a purposeful, process-based view of design. Originating from concepts of knowledge representation for machine learning, this ontology aims at constructing prototypes of design knowledge through different types of design issues. The design activities then become processes that aim at translating a set of requirement issues to a set of solution issues. Using these two sets of concepts (i.e., design issues and transitional processes), the FBS ontology of design constructs descriptive models of both design knowledge and design process. The following section contains a short introduction to this ontology and its components.